The vertical axis of the bourgeois body is primarily emphasized in the
education of the child: as s/he grows up/is cleaned up, the lower bodily stratum is regulated or denied, as far as possible, by the correct posture (“stand up straight” “don’t squat,” “don’t kneel on all
fours”-the postures of servants and savages), and by the censoring of lower “bodily” references along with bodily wastes. But while the “low of the bourgeois body becomes unmentionable, we hear an ever increasing garrulity about the city’s low”—the slum, the rag-picker, the prostitute, the sewer—the “dirt” which is “down there.” In other words, the axis of the body is transcoded through the axis of the city, and while the bodily low is “forgotten,” the city’s low becomes a site of obsessive preoccupation, a preoccupation which is itself intimately conceptualized in terms of discourses of the body. But this means that the obsessional neurosis or hysterical symptom can never be immediately traced back through the psychic domain. To deconstruct the symptomatic language of the bourgeois body it is necessary to reconstruct the mediating topography of the city which always - already inscribes relations of class, gender, and race.

PETER STALLS BRASS AND ALLON WHITE - THE CITY: THE SEWER, THE GAZE, AND THE CONTAMINATING TOUCH  (BEYOND THE BODY PROPER - Reading the Anthropology of Material Life)
  March 20, 2014 at 09:05pm

 Philippe Grandrieux - White Epilepsy

  March 20, 2014 at 08:31pm

melisica:

(by ElenaHelfrecht)

droit-dans-les-yeux:

col. 90 9 9,61x11,75

withapencilinhand:

nudes

Every layer of the human brain, every phase in the evolution of the human nervous system, every organ, cell, and even mineral component of the human body “speaks,” as it were, from its given level of organization and in the graded subjectivity of its development, to the external habitat in organic evolution from whence it came, and to the internal habitat into which it has been integrated. The “wisdom of the body,” like the wisdom of the mind, speaks in a variety of languages. We may never adequately decipher these languages, but we know they exist in the varied pulsations of our bodies, in the beat of our hearts, in the radiant energy of our musculatures, in the electrical impulses emitted by our brains, and in the emotional responses generated by complexes of nerve and hormonal interactions. A veritable “music of the spheres” resonates within each living form and between it and other living forms.

Murray Bookchin, The Ecology of Freedom p. 320-1 (via probablyasocialecologist)

And in fact the artist’s experience lies so unbelievably close to the sexual, to its pain and its pleasure, that the two phenomena are really just different forms of one and the same longing and bliss. And if instead of “heat” one could say “sex”—sex in the great, pure sense of the word, free of any sin attached to it by the Church—then his art would be very great and infinitely important. His poetic power is great and as strong as a primal instinct; it has its own relentless rhythms in itself explodes from him like a volcano.

Rainer Maria Rilke, from Letters to A Young Poet, trans. Stephen Mitchell (Modern Library, 2001)

(via apoetreflects)

c0ssette:

William-Adolphe Bouguereau,L’Aurore (detail) 1881.

(via fetishofsilence)

romandesotomayor:

Il ratto di Ganimede di Alessandro Kokocinski

Via: http://www.kokocinski.org

(via journalofanobody)

sashawantsmore:

A selection of doors from Vilhelm Hammershøi, part 01.

(via journalofanobody)

justanothermasterpiece:

Sharon Etgar.

(via caterinagiglio)

lelongdutemps:

Kiki, Sévres

Jacques-Henri Lartigue

(via journalofanobody)

sophiefranz:

sketchbook

fiore-rosso:

marija brasnic | nexus II.

shelesteniye:

Whatever pain achieves, it achieves in part through its unsharability, and it ensures this unsharability through its resistance to language. “English,” writes Virginia Woolf, “which can express the thoughts of Hamlet and the tragedy of Lear has no words for the shiver or the headache. The merest schoolgirl when she falls in love has Shakespeare or Keats to speak her mind for her, but let a sufferer try to describe a pain in his head to a doctor and language at once runs dry.” True of the headache, Woolf’s account is of course more radically true of the severe and prolonged pain that may accompany cancer or burns or phantom limb or stroke, as well as of the severe and prolonged pain that may occur unaccompanied by any nameable disease. Physical pain does not simply resist language but actively destroys it, bringing about an immediate reversion to a state anterior to language, to the sounds and cries a human being makes before language is learned.

Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain